Connect with us

World

Trump forced to declare state of emergency in Washington ahead Biden’s inauguration

Published

on

Trump forced to declare state of emergency in Washington ahead Biden’s inauguration

Embattled outgoing President of the United States of America, Donald Trump has been forced to declare a state of emergency in the capital of Washington DC ahead of the inauguration of President-elect, Joe Biden.

Trump gave the order in a White House press release issued late on Monday night, after US law enforcement officials warned of threats ahead of Biden’s inauguration.

In the press statement, White House said that the order “authorises federal assistance to be extended through January 24 to support efforts in Washington, DC to respond to the emergency situation.”

It also allows the Federal Emergency Management Agency to “identify, mobilise and provide at its discretion, equipment and resources necessary to alleviate the impacts of the emergency”.

This came after former Governor of California and ex-Hollywood actor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, reacted to the riots at the US Capitol Building on Wednesday, January 6, saying President Trump will be remembered as the worst President in the history of the United States.

Schwarzenegger, in a seven-and-a-half minute video he posted on Twitter on Sunday, said American citizens needed “to heal together, from the drama of what has just happened.”

Continue Reading
Click to comment

World

Despite Vaccination, Brazil Health Minister Tests Positive For COVID-19 After UN Assembly

Published

on

Despite Vaccination, Brazil Health Minister Tests Positive For COVID-19 After UN Assembly

Despite the Brazil’s Health Minister Marcelo Queiroga having received the Covid-19 vaccine, he tested positive for the virus on Tuesday after attending the UN General Assembly in New York.

The assembly was inaugurated by Queiroga’s president, Jair Bolsonaro.

“The other members of the delegation have been tested and are negative,” said an official Brazilian government press release.

Queiroga was the second member of Bolsonaro’s entourage to test positive for the virus since arriving in New York for the UN gathering.

The 55-year-old health minister will remain in the United States for a period of isolation, even though the rest of the delegation has returned to Brazil.

Bolsonaro, who appeared without a mask on several occasions during the trip, has not been vaccinated and repeated that he would be “the last” Brazilian to receive the vaccine.

READ ALSO: Sudan Coup Attempt Fails

Queiroga was with Bolsonaro, who last year survived a bout of the virus, at several events, including a meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Monday.

He was “doing well,” the statement said. He wrote on Twitter that while following “all health security protocols,” the ministry “will continue to take firm action to deal with the pandemic in Brazil.”

Bolsonaro caused a stir on social media after a photograph showed him taking few precautions against contagion while around others in his delegation, as he ate a slice of pizza from a New York street vendor.

The health minister was the only one in the photo wearing a mask, but he had pulled it down under his chin.

Under fire for his controversial handling of the pandemic, which has claimed more than 591,000 lives in Brazil, Bolsonaro opened the General Assembly with a speech in which he made several misleading or inaccurate statements, some of which related to the pandemic, according to AFP’s Factcheck team.

AFP

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading

World

Sudan Coup Attempt Fails

Published

on

Sudan Coup Attempt Fails

A coup attempt in Sudan reportedly failed early Tuesday.

Top military and government sources told AFP that the attempt involved a group of officers who were “immediately suspended” after they

“failed” to take over the state media building.

“There has been a failed coup attempt, the people should confront it,” state television said, without elaborating.

Senior member of Sudan’s ruling body, Taher Abuhaja, said “an attempt to seize power has been thwarted.”

Another senior ruling body member, Mohamed al-Fekki said: “Everything is under control and the revolution is victorious.”

Traffic appeared to be flowing smoothly in central Khartoum, AFP correspondents reported, including around army headquarters, where protesters staged a mass sit-in that eventually led to Bashir’s ouster in a palace coup.

Security forces did however close the main bridge across the Nile connecting Khartoum to its twin city Omdurman.

Sudan is currently ruled by a transitional government composed of both civilian and military representatives that was installed in the aftermath of Bashir’s April 2019 overthrow and is tasked with overseeing a return to full civilian rule.

READ ALSO: German Lawmakers Quiz Merkel’s Likely Successor Over Corruption Charge

The August 2019 power-sharing deal originally provided for the formation of a legislative assembly during a three-year transition, but that period was reset when Sudan signed a peace deal with an alliance of rebel groups last October.

More than two years later, the country remains plagued by chronic economic problems inherited from the Bashir regime as well as deep divisions among the various factions steering the transition.

The promised legislative assembly has yet to materialise.

The government, led by Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, has vowed to fix the country’s battered economy and forge peace with rebel groups who fought the Bashir regime.

In recent months, his government has undertaken a series of tough economic reforms to qualify for debt relief from the International Monetary Fund.

The steps, which included slashing subsidies and a managed float of the Sudanese pound, were seen by many Sudanese as too harsh.

Sporadic protests have broken out against the IMF-backed reforms and the rising cost of living, as well as delays to deliver justice to the families of those killed under Bashir.

On Monday, demonstrators blocked key roads as well as the country’s key trade hub, Port Sudan, to protest the peace deal signed with rebel groups last year.

AFP

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading

World

German Lawmakers Quiz Merkel’s Likely Successor Over Corruption Charge

Published

on

German Lawmakers Quiz Merkel's Likely Successor Over Corruption Charge

A top contender for Angela Merkel’s office as chancellor will on Monday face an investigation into an anti-money laundering agency overseen by his ministry.

The appearance of Finance Minister, Olaf Scholz, the frontrunner in the race to succeed Merkel, before the German parliament’s finance committee comes less than a week before Germans go to the polls in national elections on September 26.

MPs from opposition parties will have the opportunity to ask Scholz questions via video link after the finance and justice ministries were raided by prosecutors on September 9 as part of a probe into the Cologne-based Financial Intelligence Unit.

The body, part of Germany’s customs authority tasked with tackling money laundering, is suspected of failing to report potential wrongdoing to the relevant authorities.

Merkel’s conservative bloc has seen a steady decline in opinion polls under unpopular candidate Armin Laschet, allowing Scholz’s centre-left Social Democratic Party to grab a late polling lead.

“Nerves at the SPD are shredded” at the prospect that the scandal could have an impact on the party’s poll ratings, according to German weekly Der Spiegel.

But prosecutors are also under scrutiny over the timing of their raids.

READ ALSO: ECOWAS Gives Guinea Military Deadline To Restore Democracy

The under-pressure conservatives have seized the opportunity to attack Scholz for his involvement in the controversy.

In a televised election debate last Sunday, Laschet said the result of the finance minister’s actions was that “supervision had failed” and accused Scholz of trying to brush the issue under the carpet.

In response, Scholz distanced himself from the unit, saying the raids “had nothing to do with the ministries”, and accused Laschet of asking “dishonest” questions.

Scholz has previously been criticised for the failure of his ministry to heed early warning signs from the payments company Wirecard, which collapsed last year after acknowledging a 1.9-billion-euro ($2.2-billion) hole in its accounts.

The finance minister appeared in front of a parliamentary inquiry into Wirecard earlier this year, where he denied responsibility for the collapse of the company.

On the campaign trail, Scholz has defended his response to Wirecard, saying that he has led an effort to strengthen Germany’s financial watchdog in the aftermath.

“We did what we had to do,” Scholz said when confronted with accusations in a televised debate.
Scholz has also come under fire over Germany’s “cum-ex” tax fraud saga, a complicated share dividend scam that went on for years and is estimated to have cost the state some 5.5 billion euros.

The former mayor of Hamburg has denied putting pressure on the city’s tax authorities after meeting with the owner of a bank implicated in the scandal in 2016.

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading

Top Stories

%d bloggers like this: