Connect with us

Health

Moderna Begins COVID-19 Vaccine Trials For Children

Published

on

Why Millions Of COVID-19 Vaccines Expired - Govt

Children aged from 6 months to under 12 years old have started COVID-19 trials, according to United States manufacturer Moderna. It plans to enroll about 6,750 participants.

“We are pleased to begin this Phase 2/3 study of mRNA-1273 in healthy children in the US and Canada,” said CEO Stephane Bancel in a statement on Tuesday.

“This pediatric study will help us assess the potential safety and immunogenicity of our Covid-19 vaccine candidate in this important younger age population.”

US health authorities say that fewer children have been sick with Covid-19 compared to adults, but they can be infected and can spread the virus.
Most infected children have mild symptoms or no symptoms at all.

School officials across the US are under pressure to fully reopen as soon as possible, but many say they need portable classrooms or shorter school days to meet social distancing rules.

READ ALSO: Britain To Increase Nuclear Weapons, Review Relations With Russia, China

According to Moderna, 17.8 million adults in the United States have received its vaccine, as the country seeks to step up its innoculation programme against the coronavirus pandemic that has killed over 535,000 people in America.

The Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines have all been authorized for emergency use, and the companies are set to deliver more than enough to cover the entire US adult population by mid-year.

The United States is currently vaccinating around 2.2 million people per day, while almost 65 percent of Americans 65 and older have had at least their first shot.

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Mental Health

Leadership As Service (2)

Published

on

Leadership As Service (2)

By Akindotun Merino
Whether you prefer an authoritative leadership style, a lenient one, or something in between, one factor that can truly enhance your effectiveness in leadership is to see yourself as serving the needs of your employees even as you serve the needs of your company or organization. Often these two sets of needs will coincide. The needs of your employees are the needs of a well-run organization as well. When they do contradict, seeing yourself as a kind of servant to your employees can help you to better weigh your priorities in both the long and short terms.

The traditional form of hierarchy in business organizations is known as a top-down or vertical structure. This means that you have a clear ranking from CEO to mail-room clerk, and everyone understands their place. This structure has both advantages and disadvantages. If you are a leader in this type of organization, it is helpful to understand what those advantages and disadvantages are in order to better serve the needs of your employees.

READ ALSO: To Be Loved Or Feared? (1)

Advantages include that you always know who is in charge and who to report to; decision making is efficient and advancement up the career ladder is clearly defined.

Disadvantages include

  • The potential for power-based politics and maneuvering can result in flattering and yes-man type behavior rather than providing accurate information.
  • Employees at the bottom can feel less of a stake in the goals of a company.
  • If you have a weak leader, you will have a weak organization.
  • Information from management and higher-ups is prone to distortion as it trickles down through multiple filters.
  • Both management and employees can have a distorted understanding of what the other group does and has to deal with.

Dr. Akindotun Merino is a Professor of Psychology, CEO of Jars Group and Mental Health Commissioner in California. Feel free to share your successes and challenges:

Prof. Akindotun Merino
info@akinmerino.com
YouTube.com/akinmerino
Instagram: @drakinmerino 

Twitter: @drakindotun

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading

Mental Health

To Be Loved Or Feared? (1)

Published

on

Anger Management (5)

By Akindotun Merino
While many who enter into management and leadership roles want to be genuinely liked by the workers they supervise, seeking popularity for its own sake can be a dead-end path. Many have tried to lead while seeking popularity only to find that, indeed, they are loved but not respected. Becoming a more likeable boss however does not mean you have to sacrifice respect. However, being a likeable boss and a respected boss does mean you have to learn to be more effective. This manual helps you take the first steps on what will be a continuous journey towards becoming a more effective boss, the side effects of which are both likeability.

Is it Better to be Loved or Feared? This famous question comes down to us from Niccolo Machiavelli, a political theorist who lived in Italy during the Renaissance. He contended that a leader who is feared is preferable to a leader who is loved. However, he also lived during a time of great political instability where city governments changed in a flash, usually violently, and usually involving executions of the previous leadership. Since we no longer live in an age where stepping down from a leadership position or being removed would involve the loss of one’s head, do we really need to adopt the route that proved so disastrous for ruthless dictators?

READ ALSO: Mental Health Isn’t About Crazy People, It’s About All Of US – Akindotun Merino

The case for fear. An authoritarian approach to leadership is not all bad. Some people in leadership positions might still maintain that leaders who approach their employees with a sense of antagonism have fewer instances where employees take advantage of them. They can use “tough love” to “whip employees into shape.” Where supervisors who aim for popularity fail in setting boundaries for their employees, authoritarian leaders make those boundaries clear through well-defined consequences for crossing them. This approach to leadership seldom suffers from employees taking liberties or taking advantage of a perceived weakness from the supervisor.

The Case for Love. Well, that’s a case closed then, right? Make sure that you scare your employees, and they will treat you with respect and dare not cross you. If it were only so easy. While an authoritarian approach to leadership might give you the appearance of being respected, it’s not so likely that this respect would be genuine. Real respect must be earned, and involves respecting others. If you genuinely care about your employees, you may not have to work so hard getting them to do what needs to be done, uncovering instances where they were too afraid to approach you, or squashing conflicts with your employees that might tend to flare up when you approach your leadership role from an authoritarian standpoint. Perhaps being loved is not such a useless approach to effective leadership.

The case against either. The problem in leadership isn’t being more loved nor is it being feared more. Both have their upsides, but each also has its downside. Beloved leaders might be popular, but they might also be easily manipulated and put into unnecessary situations where it feels as if the inmates are running the asylum. Conversely, those who use fear as a leadership tactic frequently have to deal with such issues as insubordination or dishonesty from their employees. In addition, a work environment that is marked by fear turns into a poisonous place to work. Authoritarian leaders often experience higher rates of turnover from their employees. This means time that might otherwise be productively spent is now redirected towards training new employees. Any efficiency such a leader hoped to gain by cracking the whip has been lost when employees won’t stay for any length of time. There must be a middle way.

READ ALSO: Anger Management (13)

There is a middle ground. Since both leadership styles have both upsides and downsides, perhaps the best approach is to be a little bit of both. Like an authoritative leader, you want to have clear boundaries with clear consequences, but you do not want to create a fearful and poisonous work environment where everyone is trying to stab each other in the back and no one will tell you the truth, but whatever you want to hear.

In addition, a middle ground approach would mean that you do value your employees as people. You are genuinely interested in their lives. You understand that respect is a two-way street and must be earned. Yet, you impose clear boundaries. While you and your employees may be equal in both a personal and possibly even a professional sense, you have a different job than your employees. You face a different set of pressures. The key to understanding whether it is better to be loved or feared is considering the big picture and the long term, and in each situation, which approach would be more effective in the long run for that situation.

Dr. Akindotun Merino is a Professor of Psychology, CEO of Jars Group and Mental Health Commissioner in California. Feel free to share your successes and challenges:

Prof. Akindotun Merino
info@akinmerino.com
YouTube.com/akinmerino
Instagram: @drakinmerino 

Twitter: @drakindotun

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading

Mental Health

Anger Management (13)

Published

on

Anger Management (5)

By Akindotun Merino
Not all angry reactions can be effectively dealt with. Here are situations when it is more advisable to back away:

When you are too affected by an issue to view it objectively. De-escalating anger requires that you can take yourself out of an issue, even temporarily, and look at it objectively. However, if the issue has personal meaning for us, or we are too tired to properly intervene, then we don’t have the resources to de-escalate the anger.

WHAT TO DO: Withdraw from the situation and talk to someone you trust about your own feelings.

When there are warning signs for verbal and/ or physical violence. Your priority is always to ensure your well-being and safety. Warning signs for violence include a history of violent behavior, severe rage for seemingly minor reasons, possession of weapons and threats of violence.
WHAT TO DO: Get as far away from the person as you can! Go to a public place.

When there is influence of mood-altering substances. No de-escalating technique can help you deal with a person who has taken alcohol and mood-altering drugs (both legal e.g. some anti-depressants, and illegal e.g. hallucinogens).
WHAT TO DO: Disengage from the conversation and talk to them when they’re sober!

READ ALSO: Anger Management (11)

When no amount of rational intervention seems to work. There are moments when a person is hell-bent on raging, and the anger will escalate regardless of what intervention you use. It is possible that the strength of the anger is significantly more than the person’s resources to cope. This is signaled by a tendency for the anger to still take off even after slowing down and cooling down, despite the absence of provocation.
WHAT TO DO: Disengage from the conversation and re-schedule the talk for another time.

When there are signs of serious mental health conditions. While there are no categories of anger disorders in the Diagnostic Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (the reference of most mental health professionals), some serious mental health conditions are related to anger. In these cases, intensive therapy and/or psychiatric medications may be most appropriate. As a rule, people who suffer impairment of reality testing cannot be expected to be rational or reasonable.
Signs to watch out for: persecutory or paranoid delusions, hallucinations, past history of violence based on delusions.

It is important to know that Chronic and rigid patterns of the use of anger as coping mechanism may point to a personality disorder.

WHAT TO DO: Compassionate understanding is key! However, disengage yourself immediately as some psychotic symptoms are correlated with a tendency towards violence. Refer to the appropriate mental health professional.

The following are tips in putting anger management techniques into action:

Find your motivation. As with any plan towards behavioral change, it helps to sustain your motivation. Habits are hard to break and unless there is something strong that can inspire you to change, your efforts may not get followed through. So find your motivation! You can remember a negative effect of anger in your life, such as health problems or poor quality of relationships, and use it to encourage. You may also picture how things could be different if you can manage your anger better.

 READ ALSO: Anger Management (12)

Choose only one change at a time. Don’t expect change to happen overnight. After all, these may be lifetime habits that you are trying to change. Instead, stick to managing one issue at a time. Develop goals that are realistic, otherwise you might just end up frustrating yourself.

Reward yourself for your successes. If you’ve successfully managed to change, affirm yourself! Any success, no matter how small, shows that you are capable.

Choose an accountability partner. It helps to not keep your goals to yourself. Instead, select a trusted friend who knows what you are trying to accomplish. This friend can encourage you when you need additional motivation, can spur you to action when you’re lagging, and can check if you are working at the pace you promised you would.

Seek a mental health professional. If you’re really struggling with anger problems, or you just need additional support, remember: you can always seek a mental health professional. Counselors, therapists, and psychiatrist are all trained to address anger and its impact on your life.

Prof. Akindotun Merino
info@akinmerino.com
YouTube.com/akinmerino
Instagram: @drakinmerino: Twitter: @drakindotun

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading

Top Stories

%d bloggers like this: