Connect with us

World

U.S . Bars Unvaccinated Travellers

Published

on

U.S . Bars Unvaccinated Travellers

Following new COVID-19 rules it has just released, no traveller not fully vaccinated will be allowed to enter the United States (U.S.).

The U.S. said air travellers entering America would have to to be fully vaccinated and provide proof of vaccination status before boarding.

The new global travel system takes effect from November 8, 2021, replacing the existing country-by-country restrictions, putting in place a consistent approach worldwide.

Under the new rules, the U.S. government does not expect foreign national travellers who have been in one of the 33 countries with restrictions to obtain national interest exceptions to travel to the U.S.

According to a statement entitled ‘New vaccine requirements for travel to the United States starting November 8, 2021,’ the U.S. Centre for Disease Control said for the purposes of entry, vaccines accepted would include those approved or authorised by the Food and Drugs Administration as well as vaccines with an emergency use listing from the World Health Organisation.

READ ALSO: WHO Urges Screening For High Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar, Others To Check Stroke

The statement reads: “Beginning on November 8, foreign national air travellers to the United States will be required – with only limited exceptions– to be fully vaccinated and to provide proof of vaccination status prior to boarding an airplane to fly to the United States.

“This new global travel system replaces the existing country-by-country restrictions, putting in place a consistent approach worldwide.

“With the implementation of these new vaccine requirements, foreign national travellers who have been in one of the 33 countries with restrictions do not need to obtain national interest exceptions in order to travel to the United States.

“The CDC has determined that for the purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include those FDA approved or authorized, as well as vaccines with an emergency use listing (EUL) from the World Health Organization (WHO).

READ ALSO: Intelligence Operatives Warn U.S. Of Attack By Afghanistan

“When it comes to testing, fully vaccinated air travellers will continue to be required to show documentation of a pre-departure negative viral test taken within three calendar days of travel to the United States before boarding.

“That includes all travellers – U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents (LPRs), and foreign nationals. For example, if a vaccinated traveller is traveling to the United States on Saturday, they can test from Wednesday on.

“To further strengthen protections, unvaccinated travellers – whether U.S. citizens, LPRs, or the small number of excepted unvaccinated foreign nationals – will now need to show proof of a negative test within one calendar day of travel to the United States.”

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading
Click to comment

World

BREAKING:Iranian President Raisi Dies In Helicopter Crash

Published

on

Iranian President Ebrahim Iraisi

Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi has been confirmed dead in a helicopter crash.

The chopper, which also had Hossein Amirabdollahian, foreign minister; Malek Rahmati, governor of East Azarbaijan province; and Hojjatoleslam Al Hashem, Tabriz Friday prayer leader onboard, crash-landed Sunday afternoon in the Varzaqan region.

Search and rescue teams scoured the mountainous terrain amid heavy fog overnight, and found the wreckage early Monday.

Raisi, 63, was elected president on his second attempt in 2021.

He was regarded as a potential successor to Ayatollah Khamenei, the country’s supreme leader, who has held the position since 1989.

In 2019, Khamenei appointed Raisi as head of the judiciary.

Raisi was also deputy chairman of the Assembly of Experts — the 88-member clerical body responsible for electing the next supreme leader.

State media report that the Iranian government held an emergency meeting after the president and some members of the cabinet were confirmed dead on Monday.

Vice President Mohammad Mokhber led the emergency meeting.

Continue Reading

World

King Charles III Down With Cancer

Published

on

King Charles III King Charles III

By John Michael Ojo

King Charles III whose reign began in September 2022 after the death of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II is currently suffering from a cancer-related illness.

The King’s ill-health was made known on Monday evening in a circular from the Buckingham Palace.

While the circular did not reveal the exact nature of the cancer, it stated that  the disease was detected during a medical procedure that recently treated the monarch’s enlarged prostate.

The circular which has now gone viral and seen by New Times reads in part: “During The King’s recent hospital procedure for benign prostate enlargement, a separate issue of concern was noted.” “Subsequent diagnostic tests have identified a form of cancer. His Majesty has today commenced a schedule of regular treatments, during which time he has been advised by doctors to postpone public-facing duties.”

The Royal Palace added that while the King may not be facing the public anytime soon, he would however be actively working “to undertake state business and official paperwork as usual.”

“The King is grateful to his medical team for their swift intervention, which was made possible thanks to his recent hospital procedure. He remains wholly positive about his treatment and looks forward to returning to full public duty as soon as possible.”

Continue Reading

World

Namibian President Dies

Published

on

Hage Geingob

Namibia’s President Hage Geingob, 82, died in hospital early on Sunday, the presidency said, weeks after he was diagnosed with cancer.
Geingob had been in charge of the thinly populated and mostly arid southern African country since 2015, the year he announced he had survived prostate cancer.

Vice President Nangolo Mbumba takes the helm in Namibia – a mining hotspot with significant deposits of diamonds and the electric car battery ingredient lithium – until presidential and parliamentary elections at the end of the year.

A presidency post on social media platform X did not give a cause of death, but late last month the presidency said he had travelled to the United States for “a two-day novel treatment for cancerous cells”, after being diagnosed following a regular medical check-up.

Born in 1941, Geingob was a prominent politician since before Namibia achieved independence from white minority-ruled South Africa in 1990.

He chaired the body that drafted Namibia’s constitution, then became its first prime minister at independence on March 21 of that year, a position he retained until 2002.

In 2007, Geingob became vice president of the governing South West Africa People’s Organisation (SWAPO), which he had joined as an agitator for independence when Namibia was still known as South West Africa.SWAPO has remained in power in Namibia unchallenged since independence. The former German colony is technically an upper middle-income country but one with huge disparities in wealth.

“There were no textbooks to prepare us for accomplishing the task of development and shared prosperity after independence,” he said in a speech to mark the day in 2018. “We needed to build a Namibia in which the chains of the injustices of the past would be broken.”
Geingob served as trade and industry minister before becoming prime minister again in 2012.
He won the 2014 election with 87% of the vote but only narrowly avoided a runoff with a little more than half the votes in a subsequent poll in November 2019.

That election followed a government bribery scandal, in which officials were alleged to have awarded horse mackerel quotas to Iceland’s biggest fishing firm, Samherji, in exchange for kickbacks, according to local media reports. The resultant outcry led to the resignation of two ministers.

The following year, Geingob lamented that Namibia’s wealth still remained concentrated in the hands of its white minority.

“Distribution is an issue, but how do we do it?” Geingob said in a virtual session at an event organised by international organisation Horasis.

“We have a racial issue here, a historical racial divide. Now you say we must grab from the whites and give it to the Blacks, it’s not going to work,” he said.

His comments came after the government rescinded as unworkable a policy that would have made it mandatory for white-owned businesses to sell a 25% stake to Black Namibians.

Geingob died at Lady Pohamba Hospital in Windhoek, where he was receiving treatment from his medical team, the presidency said.

Continue Reading

Top Stories