Connect with us

Tech

European Commission Plans Common Charging Port

Published

on

European Commission Plans Common Charging Port

Beginning from next month, the European Commission may have a common charging port for mobile phones and other electronic devices.

A legislation to ensure a common charging port for all phones and mobile devices for all European Union countries will be presented next month by the commission.

“We gave industry plenty of time to come up with their own solutions, now time is ripe for legislative action for a common charger. This is an important win for our consumers and environment and in line with our green and digital ambitions,” Commission Vice President Margrethe Vestager said to BBC.

The commission hopes that will happen in 2022, after member states enact it into national law and manufacturers are able to change their charging ports.

READ ALSO: Govt Alerts Apple Devices’ Users To Spyware

The proposed rules will apply to smartphones, tablets, cameras, headphones, portable speakers, and handheld video game consoles. Apple may be affected by the legislation, having to abandon the iPhone’s Lightning port in favour of USB-C.

In 2018, the European Commission tried to reach a final resolution on the issue but it failed to come into law. In 2019, an impact assessment study carried out by the European Commission revealed that half of all charging cables sold with mobile phones had a USB micro-B connector, 29 per cent had a USB-C connector, and 21 per cent had a Lightning connector.

The study recommended a common charge port to cover all devices and power adapters.

In 2020, the European Parliament voted in favour of a common charger, citing less environmental waste and user convenience as the main benefits.

Legislators also considered separating the sale of a charger from that of a new mobile device and encouraging phone users to make use of what they already own.

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Tech

BREAKING: Parag Agrawal Thanks Jack Dorsey As He Takes Over Twitter

Published

on

BREAKING: Parag Agrawal Thanks Jack Dorsey As He Takes Over Twitter

Thank you, Jack. I’m honored and humbled. And I’m grateful for your continued mentorship and your friendship. I’m grateful for the service that you built, the culture, soul, and purpose you fostered among us, and for leading the company through really significant challenges. I’m grateful for the trust you’ve put in me and for your continued partnership.

Team, most of all, I’m grateful for all of you, and it’s you who inspire confidence in our future together. I joined this company 10 years ago when there were fewer than 1,000 employees. While it was a decade ago, those days feel like yesterday to me. I’ve walked in your shoes, I’ve seen the ups and downs, the challenges and obstacles, the wins and the mistakes. But then and now, above all else, I see Twitter’s incredible impact, our continued progress, and the exciting opportunities ahead of us.

Our purpose has never been more important. Our people and our culture are unlike anything in the world. There is no limit to what we can do together.

We recently updated our strategy to hit ambitious goals, and I believe that strategy to be bold and right. But our critical challenge is how we work to execute against it and deliver results – that’s how we’ll make Twitter the best it can be for our customers, shareholders, and for each of you. I want you to #LoveWhere You Work and also love how we work together for the greatest possible impact.

READ ALSO: Twitter Agreed To Conditions For Resuming Operations – Keyamo

I recognize that some of you know me well, some just a little, and some not at all. Let’s consider ourselves at the beginning-the first step towards our future. I’m sure you have lots of questions and there’s a lot for us to discuss. At the all-hands tomorrow we’ll have lots of time for Q&A and discussion. It will be the beginning of ongoing open, direct conversations I wish for us to have together.

The world is watching us right now, even more than they have before. Lots of people are going to have lots of different views and opinions about today’s news. It is because they care about Twitter and our future, and it’s a signal that the work we do here matters. Let’s show the world Twitter’s full potential.

#One Team

Parag Agrawal November 29, 2021

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading

Tech

Why Did Ancient Egyptian Pharaohs Stop Building Pyramids?

Published

on

Why Did Ancient Egyptian Pharaohs Stop Building Pyramids?

By

Owen Jarus

For more than a millennia, Egyptian pharaohs had pyramids constructed and often were buried beneath or within the massive monuments.

Egyptian pharaohs constructed pyramids between the time of King Djoser (reign 2630 to 2611 B.C.), who built a step pyramid at Saqqara, to the time of King Ahmose I (reign 1550 to 1525 B.C.), who built the last known royal pyramid in Egypt at Abydos.

These iconic pyramids displayed the pharaohs’ power, wealth and promoted their religious beliefs. So why did the ancient Egyptians stop building pyramids shortly after the New Kingdom began?

In ancient Egypt, pyramid construction appeared to wane after the reign of Ahmose, with pharaohs instead being buried in the Valley of the Kings near the ancient Egyptian capital of Thebes, which is now modern-day Luxor. The Theban Mapping Project notes on their website that the earliest confirmed royal tomb in the valley was built by Thutmose I (reign 1504 to 1492 B.C.). His predecessor Amenhotep I (reign 1525 to 1504 B.C.) may also have had his tomb built in the Valley of the Kings, although this is a matter of debate among Egyptologists.

READ ALSO: Facebook Founder Zuckerberg Loses $711m In Eght Hours

It’s not entirely clear why pharaohs stopped building royal pyramids, but security concerns could have been a factor.

“There are plenty of theories, but since pyramids were inevitably plundered, hiding the royal burials away in a distant valley, carved into the rock and presumably with plenty of necropolis guards, surely played a role,” Peter Der Manuelian, an Egyptology professor at Harvard University, told Live Science in an email.

“Even before they gave up on pyramids for kings, they had stopped placing the burial chamber under the pyramid. The last king’s pyramid — that of Ahmose I, at Abydos — had its burial chamber over 0.5 km [1,640 feet] away, behind it, deeper in the desert,” Aidan Dodson, an Egyptology professor at the University of Bristol, told Live Science in an email.

One historical record that may hold important clues was written by a man named “Ineni,” who was in charge of building the tomb of Thutmose I in the Valley of the Kings. Ineni wrote that “I supervised the excavation of the cliff tomb of his majesty alone — no one seeing, no one hearing.” This record “obviously suggests that secrecy was a major consideration,” Ann Macy Roth, a clinical professor of art history and Hebrew and Judaic studies at New York University, told Live Science in an email.

The natural topography of the Valley of the Kings could explain why it emerged as a favored location for royal tombs. It has a peak now known as el-Qurn (sometimes spelled Gurn), which looks a bit like a pyramid. The peak “closely resembles a pyramid, [so] in a way all royal tombs built in the valley were placed beneath a pyramid,” Miroslav Bárta, an Egyptologist who is vice rector of Charles University in the Czech Republic, told Live Science in an email.

READ ALSO: Facebook Changes Name

For Egyptian pharaohs the pyramid was important as it was a place “of ascension and transformation” to the afterlife, wrote Mark Lehner, director and president of Ancient Egypt Research Associates, in his book “The Complete Pyramids: Solving the Ancient Mysteries” (Thames and Hudson, 1997).

The topography of Luxor, which became the capital of Egypt during the New Kingdom (1550 to 1070 B.C.) may also have played a role in the decline of pyramid construction. The area is “far too restricted in space, with also lots of lumps and bumps,” Dodson said. In other words, the ancient capital may have been too small and architecturally challenging to serve as the home for new pyramids.

Religious changes that emphasized building tombs underground are another possible reason the Egyptians ditched grand pyramids. “During the New Kingdom, a concept of the night journey of the king through the Netherworld became extremely popular, and this required sophisticated plans of the tombs hewn in bedrock below ground,” Bárta said. The underground tombs hewn into the Valley of the Kings fit this concept well.

While pharaohs stopped building pyramids, wealthy private individuals continued the practice. For example a 3,300 year-old tomb at Abydos, which was built for a scribe named Horemheb, had a 23-foot-high (7 meters) pyramid at its entrance, archaeologists announced in 2014.

During the first millennium B.C., pyramid building also became popular in Nubia, an area that includes what is now Sudan and parts of southern Egypt. The Nubians built pyramids for both royalty and private individuals. How many they built is not clear, Lehner noted in his book that there are about 180 royal pyramids while recent archaeological research reveals that there were many more pyramids constructed for private individuals. The rulers of Nubia continued building pyramids until around 1,700 years ago.

Originally published on Live Science.

Owen Jarus writes about archaeology and all things about humans’ past for Live Science. Owen has a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Toronto and a journalism degree from Ryerson University. He enjoys reading about new research and is always looking for a new historical tale.

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading

Tech

Facebook Founder Zuckerberg Loses $711m In Eght Hours

Published

on

Facebook Founder Zuckerberg Loses $711m In Eght Hours

In just eight hours on Wednesday, Facebook founder, Mark Zuckerberg, lost N317.52 billion ($711 million) after his company, Meta Platforms Inc, was accused of replicating a technology idea to which its executives had been privy .

The allegation was made by HaptX Inc. founder and Chief Executive Officer, Jake Rubin. The company specialises in creating gadgets for augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) with microfluidic haptic.

Microfluidic haptic feedback, such from the glove, uses actuators, allowing for more natural or smooth sensations in the hand, unlike haptic feedback that comes with a game controller that uses small motors and buzz or rumble in the hands of the user.

Rubin wrote a note on Tuesday, disclosing that its prototype microfluidic haptic feedback glove is “substantively identical” to the version Meta unveiled to the world on November 16, 2021.

HaptX’s patent prototype had been in existence long before Zuckerberg’s company launched theirs, and in the past years, Rubin’s firm had shown it to “many engineers, researchers, and executives from Meta.”

HaptX has raised $32.51 million to scale in the market of microfluidic haptic, against a rival like Meta, which is worth $947.94 billion, and the world’s 7th most valuable company by market cap.

This is not the first time minority tech companies are accusing Meta, previously known as Facebook Inc., with the firm said to have ripped off Snapchat ideas after the founders refused to sell when Zuckerberg offered $3 billion.

He later acquired Instagram instead. But in its twelve years of operation, government agencies in Europe and UK had also accused Facebook Inc. of anti-competition.

READ ALSO: Facebook Changes Name

In a LinkedIn post, Rubin wrote, “We welcome interest and competition in the field of microfluidic haptic, however, competition has to be fair for the industry to thrive.”

In another post in HaptX blog, he said, “While we have not yet heard from Meta, we look forward to working with them to reach a fair and equitable arrangement that addresses our concerns and enables them to incorporate our innovative technology into their future consumer products,”

A day after Rubin accused Meta of replicating its innovation, Zuckerberg lost N317.52 billion as his total fortune depleted to $121.9 billion following a 0.64 percent crash in Meta’s market value which dropped to $340.77 per share from $342.96.

 

Read more authentic news on our social media platforms

Continue Reading

Top Stories

%d bloggers like this: